Friday, November 24, 2017

The over-regulated driver may soon be... you?


A recent video about the impact of monitoring technology on the long-range trucking industry discusses so-called "electronic logging devices" and their effect on drivers.  However, it doesn't take the next logical step.  If these regulations appear to reduce accident rates and increase safety for truckers, how long will it take before the electronic devices they mandate appear in consumer vehicles, too?  Is there any technical or regulatory reason why the authorities should not mandate that every driver on the road must use them - or be forbidden to drive at all?

Watch the video with that in mind.





Given the massive increase in the number of computer chips in modern vehicles, I can't think of a single reason why such monitoring systems couldn't be designed into our cars and pickups from the ground up.  If we, as drivers, failed to comply with their requirements, those systems could simply disable our vehicles, or force us to drive at greatly reduced speeds, all in the name of "safety".

Even if that doesn't apply countrywide, you might find cities with big traffic problems forcing the adoption of such policies as a method to control drivers.  For example, in areas where there's a slowdown or traffic jam, vehicles approaching them could be electronically commanded to slow down, or their drivers "advised" to take an alternate route.  If police wanted to catch a fugitive, vehicles all over town could be instructed to slow down, making sure more of them would be caught in the dragnet, because they couldn't speed past a potential roadblock before it could be set up.

The possibilities for "Big Brother" are endless.  I'm sure plans like that are already among the wet dreams of the statists among us.

Peter

Thursday, November 23, 2017

The Thanksgiving trifle


After posting my recipes for Thanksgiving trifle last night, I thought you might like to see how the alcoholic version turned out.  Clickit to biggit.




Note the cat in the background, who's decided she doesn't like whipped cream that's had a dose of bourbon folded into it!




Peter

Let us give thanks


I'm sure many of us have worries, problems or hassles that tend to weigh us down.  However, today, let's put them aside, and be thankful for our many blessings.  In particular, if you live in one of the so-called 'developed nations', remember that many of your problems pale into insignificance compared to those who live elsewhere.  There are literally millions of people in the Third World who'd cheerfully commit murder in order to live the lifestyle of the poorest of the First World poor.  That's how much better off we are.

I'm thankful for the grace of God, for my wife, for my friends, for my relatively good health despite a partly disabling injury some years ago, for living in a free country . . . for so many things.  It's good to remember them all on a day like this.  It's not just about the turkey and trifle.

Whoever and wherever you are, may you have much for which to give thanks, and may your celebrations be joyful.

Peter

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

You wanted my trifle recipes? Here they are.


In a comment to my previous post, reader Deborah Harvey asked for the recipe I was using to make trifle for Thanksgiving.  I ended up making two, one with alcohol and one without, the latter being for kids, and those who may have to drive after the meal.  I'll provide both recipes.  They're how my mother used to make trifle in South Africa when I was growing up.  They're based on traditional English recipes, with colonial variations.  I'm using fruit and alcohol more readily available here in the USA.


1.  Non-alcoholic fruit trifle.
You will need:
  • A container, preferably glass, about 9"-10" round and 6"-8" deep.
  • A sponge cake to fit in the bottom of the container, either whole or broken into pieces;  alternatively, ladyfinger biscuits.  I prefer not to use pound cake, as I think it affects the flavor;  but YMMV, of course.
  • A one-pound tin of canned apricot halves, preferably in natural (i.e. non-sugared) syrup.
  • A one-pound tin of fruit cocktail, preferably ditto.
  • One box/packet of orange Jell-o or equivalent.
  • One box/packet of lemon Jell-o or equivalent.
  • Custard powder of your choice, enough to make 2 pints, plus the necessary ingredients for it (sugar, milk, etc.)
  • 2-3 cups heavy cream, suitable for whipping.  I prefer to make more rather than less, because if you have too much, you can always discard it or use it for something else;  but if you have too little, your trifle will be incomplete.
  • A jar of Maraschino cherries.
Method:
  1. Put the sponge cake or ladyfingers in the bottom of the glass bowl, spreading them out evenly to cover the area completely.
  2. Drain the apricot halves, reserving the syrup.  Place the halves face-down on the sponge cake, spacing them evenly across the bottom.
  3. Drain the fruit cocktail, reserving the syrup.  Spread the fruit pieces over and around the apricot halves, making sure to produce a level surface.
  4. Combine the two packets of Jell-o and prepare according to directions.  Use the fruit syrup reserved in steps 2 and 3 as part of the cold water to produce the finished product.
  5. Pour the Jello-and-fruit-syrup mixture over the sponge cake and fruit in the bottom of the bowl, using just enough to come to the top of the layer of fruit, but not completely submerge it.  Either discard the rest of the Jell-o mixture, or chill it in other containers for other uses.
  6. Make the custard according to directions.  Spread a layer of custard approximately 1" thick over the fruit (thicker if you prefer).  Use a ladle to spread it slowly and evenly, so as not to disrupt the layer beneath it.
  7. At this point, if the depth of the bowl allows it, you can make a second layer of sponge cake or ladyfingers, fruit, Jell-o, and custard. If it's not deep enough for that, that's OK.  Remember to chill the bottom layers, to set the Jell-o and custard, before you add more warm Jell-o above them!  This can be tricky, so be careful.
  8. Put the trifle in the fridge to chill.  It works well if you do all the steps so far the previous evening, chill it overnight, then finish making it the following morning.
  9. After the trifle has chilled, whip the cream as long as necessary to produce thick, sturdy peaks.  Spread the whipped cream in an even layer over the custard layer (I usually try to make the layers equally thick, but that's a matter of taste).
  10. Decorate the whipped cream layer with maraschino cherries.  Serve, and enjoy.

2.  Alcoholic fruit trifle.
You will need:
  • A container, preferably glass, about 9"-10" round and 6"-8" deep.
  • A sponge cake to fit in the bottom of the container, either whole or broken into pieces; alternatively, ladyfinger biscuits.  I prefer not to use pound cake, as I think it affects the flavor;  but YMMV, of course.
  • A pound of fresh blackberries, and a pound of fresh raspberries.  (If you wish, you can substitute berries of your preference, such as blueberries or strawberries;  just make sure they work with the liqueur you plan to use.)
  • Custard powder of your choice, enough to make 2 pints, plus the necessary ingredients for it (sugar, milk, etc.)
  • 2-3 cups heavy cream, suitable for whipping.  I prefer to make more rather than less, because if you have too much, you can always discard it or use it for something else;  but if you have too little, your trifle will be incomplete.
  • A jar of Maraschino cherries.
  • Alcohol of your choice.  Sherry or port is traditional for use in trifles, but I've also made them with brandy, rum, and bourbon.  Use good quality liquor!  The cheap stuff just doesn't taste as good.  Also, pick a liqueur in which to marinate your berries, whatever they may be.  Not all liqueurs will taste good with all berries, so pick a combination that works for you.  For the trifle I just made, I marinated the fruit in a brandy-based liqueur.
Method:
  1. Put the berries into liqueur and let them marinate for an hour or so.  I suggest putting them in separate bowls, because the flavor of each combination will be different, and this helps to preserve it.
  2. Put the sponge cake or ladyfingers in the bottom of the glass bowl, spreading them out evenly to cover the area completely.
  3. Take about half a cup of port or sherry (or your chosen liqueur) and sprinkle it over the sponge cake or ladyfingers, wetting but not soaking them.  (If you want to use more, you can, but you don't want the alcohol to overpower the other flavors, so be cautious.)
  4. Drain about half of the berries, using a slotted spoon, and spread them in a layer across the sponge cake or ladyfingers.
  5. Make the custard according to directions.  Spread a layer of custard approximately 1" thick over the fruit (thicker if you prefer).  Use a ladle to spread it slowly and evenly, so as not to disrupt the layer beneath it.
  6. At this point, if the depth of the bowl allows it, you can make a second layer of sponge cake or ladyfingers, liqueur, fruit, and custard.  If it's not deep enough for that, that's OK.
  7. Put the trifle in the fridge to chill.  It works well if you do all the steps so far the previous evening, chill it overnight, then finish making it the following morning.
  8. After the trifle has chilled, whip the cream as long as necessary to produce thick, sturdy peaks.  Spread the whipped cream in an even layer over the custard layer (I usually try to make the layers equally thick, but that's a matter of taste).
  9. Decorate the whipped cream layer with maraschino cherries.  Serve, and enjoy.

There you have it.  I think they work very well.  Of course, trifle lends itself to endless adaptation, so you can play with the recipes as you see fit, substituting your own ingredients in place of mine, adding more, or whatever.

My two trifles are now chilling in the fridge, prior to having the final cream layer added tomorrow morning.  Miss D. and I just have to resist the temptation to sample them, to see how they came out!

Peter

Be careful out there, friends


I know many of my readers will be traveling this Thanksgiving weekend.  Some of you have already left home;  others will do so after work today.  Wherever you are, and wherever you're going, please be careful, and travel safely.  I'd like to see all of you safely back home after this long weekend.

As for Miss D. and I, we'll be joining our friends locally for a jointly prepared Thanksgiving supper tomorrow.  I'm making an English-style sherry trifle, according to my late mother's recipe, which is bigger and more complex than some.  Fruit, sponge cake, mixed fruit Jello to hold the fruit and sponge cake together, ladyfingers, sherry or port to soak into them, lots of custard, and plenty of whipped cream, all topped with maraschino cherries.  That should keep us going for the weekend!

Have fun, y'all.

Peter

Hot food from a hot rocker


Ian Anderson, the composer and musician behind rock supergroup Jethro Tull, is also a fan of Indian food - so much so that he's written an introduction to it for his fans.  Here's an excerpt.

First of all: meat, fish or vegetable as a main course? Let’s get the big and scary bit out of the way. Dry or in a sauce? Spicy-hot or mild and creamy?

The great thing about Indian cuisine is the availability of vegetarian options. Lentils, greens, roots and branches, are all conjured up to please, titillate and satisfy. Perhaps in the form of an integrated and complete Vegetarian Thali, attractively served in a “silver” dish of that name, the chance to sample several small vegetable portions will be found. No longer the poor cousin of the carnivorous night-out nibbler, you may indulge yourself with glee, ghee (purified butter) and total satisfaction in your descent to the ultimate in Vegan gluttony. Whoops, forgot about the butter...

Let’s first consider the mild: Korma, Passanda and Muglai are the words to watch for. Liberal in their creamy mildness, these dishes, from different areas of the Indian sub-continent, will be face and bowel-savers when the chips are down.

For those who favour the dryer, purer and not-too-hot taste of the source meat or fish, try the Tikka or Tandoori versions.

Really spicy hot stuff will be tackled head-on in the Madras or Vindaloo variations on the theme. Brave but occasionally foolish forkers, like me, will feel compelled to go for the Phal or Tindaloo, those macho show-off botty-crippling dishes which we become strangely ever-addicted to. Nothing disrupts a band sound-check like the pervasive after-effects of the Tarka Dhal (lentils and garlic).

There's more at the link.  Very useful if you don't know much about Indian cooking.

I grew up in South Africa, which has a large Indian population (Mahatma Gandhi worked there as an expatriate lawyer and civil rights activist - and, during the Boer War, as a stretcher bearer).  Thus, Indian food has a rich history in South Africa, affecting and being influenced by the Dutch cooking of the Boer settlers and the English cooking of Imperial Britain.

One of my not-so-fond memories of my early working years is of taking an Indian colleague home after an all-night shift in a computer room.  He invited me to join him and his wife for breakfast.  She served cold curry from the refrigerator that she'd made for supper the night before.  Even cold, it was so "hot" (i.e. spicy) that it felt as if my mouth was on fire - and, a day or so later, my nether regions felt likewise as it completed its travels through my alimentary canal!  Despite that, I came to enjoy a "warm" curry now and again;  so much so, that I cooked one for my wife and our landlord, early in our marriage.  I was chewing thoughtfully, and opining that it needed a touch more of this spice and a smidgen more of that, while perspiration was pouring down their faces and they were gasping for breath.  That's when I realized one can develop a tolerance for curry that isn't universally shared . . .

Be that as it may, I continue to enjoy curry, and my wife has developed a taste for the milder versions thereof.  She makes a pretty good chicken curry, which we enjoy together from time to time.  If you've never tried curry, it rewards the effort - provided you start with the mild stuff!  Don't jump straight into a vindaloo.  Your digestive system will not only not thank you, it'll actively punish you a day or two later.  Remember the song "Ring of Fire"?  You'll have one too.  Yeah.  Right.  That ring . . . and love will have nothing to do with it!








Peter

Doofus Of The Day #986


Today's award goes to the directors of a Catholic school in Adelaide, Australia, whose artistic judgement has turned out to be, in a word, catastrophically inept.  A tip o' the hat to Australian reader Snoggeramus for bringing it to my attention.

AN Adelaide Catholic school has been forced to cover and cordon off a new religious statue after raising eyebrows for its unfortunate design.


Blackfriars Priory School, at Prospect, unveiled the statue late last week of St Dominic handing a young boy a loaf of bread, which appears to have emerged from his cloak.

One of St Dominic’s miracles was the ample supply of bread.

But the sculpture’s unintentionally provocative design has had unintended consequences and created a flurry of activity on social media ... the school was forced to cover the statue with a black cloth after students took inappropriate photos on Friday and by this week it had been cordoned off.

One Instagram user wrote: “Like who the hell designed, approved and erected it and no one thought about it?”.

Another user wrote: “Blackfriars is not alone. I saw heaps of similarly dodgy ones while living in Chile”.

Other users commented: “surely this can’t be real” and “can’t believe this happened”.

There's more at the link.

Verily, the mind doth boggle.  After all the publicity about Catholic priests and child sex abuse, for a Catholic school to display a statue like that, even if it does depict a saint and a well-known incident in his hagiography . . . the sheer stupidity, the lack of common sense and understanding of whoever approved that design, is truly epic.  He, she or they need to be removed from their posts at once, before they do any more damage to what is otherwise probably a very good school.

(Of course, we can guess what the schoolboys must be saying about it!  During my own school days, I can't recall that we were ever renowned for our respect for authority.  Given their irreverent national heritage and Australians' well-earned reputation for "taking the piss", schoolboys down under must be doubly so!)

Peter

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The (in)famous Pachelbel Rant


Following my most recent Sunday Morning Music entry, I had a number of people ask to hear Rob Paravonian's (in)famous "Pachelbel Rant".  I've put it up before, but how can I resist doing so again?





Great stuff!

Peter

More about IFAK's (Individual First Aid Kits)


Following the Las Vegas shooting last month, I wrote about the need to keep an IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit) on hand if possible.  Even if one can't use it to best effect oneself, one can make it available to emergency personnel, whose own supplies may run low in a mass casualty event like that.  Aesop added his own expert opinion on the subject.  If you haven't already read both articles, I recommend doing so before continuing with this one.

Regular readers will know that I've been friends with Kelly Grayson, a.k.a. Ambulance Driver, for many years.  He's a senior and widely respected paramedic and EMT, and is in demand as a speaker on the emergency medical conference circuit.  When I met him again at Blogorado last month, I asked him to post his thoughts on the best IFAK components, for the benefit of all of us.  He's done so at his own blog, along with some very important considerations about when and how to use it.  Here's an excerpt to whet your appetite.

YOU, as a bystander, are going to be judged very forgivingly on the actions you take, as long as you stay in your lane. You don’t have a duty to act, and nobody expects you to do trauma surgery in Shooting Bay #5 when Cletus violates more than his customary one of Colonel Cooper’s Four Rules of Gun Safety.

But in this era of YouTube instructional videos and online marketplaces that will allow you to purchase sophisticated medical equipment without so much as a certificate to demonstrate you know how to use them, you can put yourself into precarious legal footing rather easily.

Sure, you can watch a video on suturing and wound closure and practice a few times on a pickled pig’s foot, watch a video on intravenous cannulation and procure the proper supplies, buy a King airway and watch the instructional video, but if you start using that stuff in anything outside a TEOTWAWKI situation, you have stepped far outside the protective boundaries of the Good Samaritan Law, and are now practicing medicine without a license.

And you’re gonna get your ass sued, and rightfully so, because something will go wrong, and you don’t have enough education or training to know what you don’t know.

So I’ll boil it down to what you, a layperson, can do without running afoul of the tort (and maybe even the criminal justice) system: Putting stuff ON a victim, pretty much okay. Putting stuff IN a victim, not kosher.

There are some exceptions to that, like for example, wound packing in severe hemorrhage, but if you stay away from specialized invasive medical devices, your chances of getting sued lie somewhere between slim and none.

With that in mind, here’s what I recommend you carry in your range first aid kit, and this is the same basic equipment I give to all participants in my Shooter Self Care classes [see reviews of a previous class here].

There's much more at the linkHighly recommended reading, particularly in these troubled and more dangerous times.

Thanks, AD, for stepping up to the plate with your advice.  I'll be following it.

Peter

So much for a modern college education


Jim Goad brings the smackdown to current US college standards.

American colleges are no longer institutions of higher learning. It would be more apt to refer to them as state-sanctioned seminaries for the secular religion of Cultural Marxism. Instead of strolling out of college with nimbler minds, students now stumble out into the real world with their brains scrubbed clean of the ability to hatch a single independent thought.

. . .

Rather than being instructed in crucial matters—such as how to detect logical fallacies and distinguish between what’s objective and subjective—modern students indenture themselves to the loan-peddlers for the dubious honor of taking inane courses such as “Kanye Versus Everbody! [sic],” “Sci-Fi Queered,” “What If Harry Potter Is Real?,” and “How to Watch Television.”

While piously posing as staunchly anti-racist—whatever the hell that means, because it can’t be quantified—students are instead encouraged to channel all of their latent racial hatred toward the very idea of white people.

. . .

American colleges no longer bother to even pretend that they’re teaching students how to think. Instead, their noble mission is making sure that every last trace of a dissident thought is mercilessly shotgunned out of their students’ brains before unleashing them into a world where they have trouble tying their own shoes without doubling their normal dose of antidepressants.

So let the colleges die. Let the teachers—almost to the last gender-fluid one of them an Armchair Marxist who fetishizes the “working class” from afar—learn what it’s really like to earn a living.

For grade school and high school, hire teachers who know how to keep their personal ideology out of the classroom. Have them act like boot-camp sergeants in drilling the three Rs into kids’ soft little skulls.

The current yearly average cost for a college education runs from about $10K for state residents at public colleges to a little over $30K for public colleges.

For about a thousand bucks, you can buy a cheap laptop and an internet connection for a year. And if you’re remotely intelligent and inquisitive and motivated, you can find all the knowledge the world has to offer online. We need more autodidacts and fewer casualties of collegiate indoctrination.

The only intelligent thing to do with modern American colleges is to get rid of them.

There's more at the link.  Highly recommended reading.

I've had contact with a fairly large number of current students and recent graduates over the past decade or so.  Almost uniformly, they astonish me with their lack of knowledge and lack of understanding of the real world.  They appear to have been taught to demand that the world conform to what they think it should be - and their thoughts have been trained and formed almost exclusively from a Marxist rhetorical perspective.  They bear little or no relation to reality.  There are, of course, some honorable exceptions to that rule;  but I'd say four out of five students don't qualify, in my experience.  Obviously, some fields (e.g. medicine, engineering, etc.) require a college education;  but in the fields of liberal arts, the "soft" sciences, etc., I can't help thinking that most students would be better off not going to university at all, given current academic standards (or the lack thereof).

I also wish more young people would consider part-time instead of full-time tertiary education.  I could never afford to go to university full-time, so all four of my tertiary qualifications were earned part-time;  two through correspondence study, and two through evening classes after work.  I missed the "social experience" of life on campus, of course, but looking back, I can't say that did me any harm.  Instead, I graduated every degree free of student loan debt, and having earned an increasingly good living in the process.  Such distance education degrees are freely available to US students, particularly if they register with overseas institutions such as Britain's Open University or the University of South Africa (there are many others).  Even better, the academic standards at foreign universities are often higher and more rigorous than those at US institutions, and free of many of the "politically correct" requirements that bedevil US curricula.  That has the potential to deliver a superior education to students who are prepared to put in the work necessary to take advantage of it.

The Internet wasn't a factor when I did my degrees, but it would have helped enormously.  Nowadays, when many Ivy League university lectures are available online, either free of charge or for a relatively small fee, it's indispensable.  What's more, there are many accredited "online institutions" dedicated to providing low-cost, high-quality education.  I know a couple of young people who are auditing lectures online from several different universities, then using what they've learned to "test out" of the subject requirements at the state universities where they've enrolled.  Through careful planning, they've found they can complete more than half the required coursework in this fashion, and cut the time needed to earn a Bachelors degree almost in half - not to mention saving tens of thousands of dollars in course fees and related expenses.

Finally, of course, many jobs don't actually need a university education - it's just become expected by default.  Mike Rowe deserves kudos for setting up the mikeroweWORKS Foundation, which offers "scholarships for jobs that actually exist", encouraging work-seekers to enter apprenticeships and technical studies instead of colleges.  I highly encourage any young person looking for career opportunities to consider its programs.  If I were younger, believe me, I'd be banging on his door first thing!  Compared to most US colleges today, that's a no-brainer decision.

Peter

Monday, November 20, 2017

Worn out


Alma Boykin came down to stay with Miss D. and I over the weekend.  Old NFO, Lawdog and the lovely Phlegmmy joined us for the festivities, accompanied by aepilotjim when he wasn't working.  Much fun was had eating at local restaurants, shooting at a local range, and working late assembling (or starting to assemble) a large jigsaw puzzle.  Alma's good company.

Our cats enjoyed the visitor, too.  Kili largely took it in her stride, as befits the senior cat, but Ashbutt's still in kitten mode when it comes to playing (and will be for several years yet - he's part Maine Coon, after all, and that's a characteristic of the breed).  He dogged Alma's footsteps, tried to sneak into the guest room with her to sleep on her bed (she was wise to that, having her own feline companion, and fended him off at the door), and bugged her whenever possible to play with him using his favorite toy, a string on a stick.

This is how he looked this afternoon after she'd left.  (Clickit to biggit.)




That's one worn-out cat!

Peter

Give this article to the socialists in your life (if any)


Aaron Clarey, a.k.a. Captain Capitalism, has written a very useful, easily understandable primer on why it's necessary for businesses to make a profit.  Here's a brief excerpt.

The simplest way to understand why profits are necessary is to understand it from a perspective of providing goods and services.  This is an oft forgotten or ignored aspect of economics because everybody seems to focus on MONEY and not the things that actually matter - GOODS AND SERVICES.

I cannot eat a dollar.
A Yen will not provide you surgery.
A pound will not feed your dog.
And a Euro will not fuel your car.

However, these currencies WILL buy us the goods and services that provide ultimate value and utility in life.  A dollar will buy me an apple that I can eat.  A Yen will buy me some gas that will fuel my car.  A Euro will buy a dentist's services to repair your teeth.  And a pound will buy some dental floss after your dentists lectures you for not flossing.  So the whole point and purpose of an economy is to produce the stuff, not the money nor necessarily profits in the process of doing so.

Since it is the stuff that needs producing that ultimately matters you need to ask how stuff gets produced, and the answer is "not charitably."

In order for things to get produced, somebody has to inevitably forfeit some of their time to produce them.  This can be done on an individual level as per subsistence type craphole economies like Africa, or in the awesome 1st world through organizations, namely, corporations and companies.  Large and complex systems organizing capital and labor to produce an amazing plethora of things all on the cheap.  But regardless of the size of the company, it has to ultimately be started.  And since time is ultimately the ONLY resource that matters to humans, any sane and self-respecting human is going to demand he or she be compensated for it.

Thus introducing profit.

This is the problem most people who have a problem with profit face.  They look at it backwards.  The issue isn't whether somebody deserves profit or whether profit should exist.  NOTHING would exist unless it was for profit.  And the insurance industry explains this incredibly well.

There's more at the link.

This is the sort of thing that socialists can never seem to understand.  Without the incentive of profit to motivate them, why should individuals or businesses work for the common good?  They won't, of course, as the history of applied socialism makes dismally clear . . . but somehow a lot of young people are taken in by this false argument and fake philosophy.

If you have such people among your friends and/or acquaintances and/or colleagues, let them have a copy of Aaron Clarey's article.  It might make them think - for once.

Peter

Doofus Of The Day #985


Doofi have been popping up all over the place lately.  I wonder if we'll hit #1,000 by the end of the year?  Be that as it may, today's winner comes from Germany.

A man with an oversized Christmas tree has left a trail of destruction in his wake after blundering through a small town in southern Germany with it hanging off the back of his truck.

The hapless driver, who had apparently completely underestimated the size of the tree, towed it on his trailer through the picturesque town of Kandern, in Baden-Württemberg, on Saturday morning.

Unaware of the size of his truck’s large backside, the man bashed into several road signs and damaged a bridge as he swerved round corners and made his way through town.

His reckless driving meant oncoming motorists had to slam on the emergency brakes to avoid smashing into the tree, local police said.

Meanwhile, those driving behind him were forced to swerve to avoid branches that had broken away en route.

. . .

One shocked motorist contacted the police, who tracked the driver by simply following the trail of branches.

There's more at the link.

I wonder if they'll charge him with high tree-son?




Peter

First Sergeants and Second Lieutenants


I received the link to this video from several readers.  Thanks to all of you!  The military veterans among my readers, irrespective of their branch of service, will recognize the truth in this exchange.





I think I've met that Second Lieutenant a few times . . . although I hope and pray I never acted like that during my "salad days, when I was green in judgment"!




Peter